English

Welcome to the English Department

We encourage and welcome students to join us in the exciting adventures of international communications, education and literature in the English department. A degree in English is a valuable tool as you build your professional and academic career. Students of linguistics, literature, and education enjoy learning in an international setting. The LCC English department promotes learning, teaching and research of topics that emphasize the current global importance of the English language and its traditions.

Our Graduates: Here is a small snapshot of what several of our graduates are doing now:

  • Eglė Ruoke – full time English teacher at Klaipėdos Balsio menų gimnazija
  • Elena Trečiokaitė- successfully completed an MA in Literature at Klaipėda University.
  • Laura Vaštakienė (Vasiliauskaitė) – freelance translator working with legal, formal and informal letters; also translator for the TV mystery series, Merdoch Mysteries.
  • Yulia Kazakova – currently studying for her Masters of Divinity in the School of Theology at Boston University, USA
  • Tetyana Boyko – currently studying for her Master’s Degree in Education and Globalization at the University of Oulu in Finland.

Career Opportunities

The English Language and Literature program is designed for a wide range of future possibilities because it includes preparation in the fields of teaching, translation and interpretation, and literature. Students choose the English program because they wish to be involved in the international world of teaching, business, government, international affairs, peacemaking and any occupation that calls for highly-developed skills in oral and written communication.

The international nature of LCC International University provides an excellent context for linguistics. Students will live and study in a multicultural environment so students observe theory being practiced both in the classroom and immediately outside the classroom. Students are also exposed to a variety of strategies that can assist them in developing those skills for teaching, translation and interpretation and they have multiple opportunities for practicum experiences outside of LCC while fulfilling their requirements. Studying literature in English offers students a unique cross-cultural opportunity. Within various courses, students are given the opportunity to read across many cultures.

What our graduates say

Laura writes, “I was glad to be an English major because I had a chance to meet wonderful people – teachers, who love what they are doing, and students, who seek knowledge.”

Robertas says, “English is not just teaching and translation, but it is also a part of a wider perspective – of linguistics and linguistic philosophy; it is also a tool of introducing faith to all who are thirsty and in need of it; it is also a way of communication; it is a beautiful language, needless to say.”

Tetyana was well prepared for her graduate studies. “I cannot even begin to tell you what kind of experience it’s been!”

Program Basics

English majors build their own program based on their interests and abilities.

Teaching English

If you are interested in teaching, you will want to take more classes in pedagogy and language acquisition. You will have a practicum experience in a local public school or language center where you will improve your teaching skills.

Translation/ Interpretation

If you are interested in translation, you will take courses in phonetics and translation skills. You will practice your skill with professionals off campus in your practicum course. As an international campus with many activities and events, you will have many opportunities to practice your skills on campus as well.

Literature

If you are interested in literature, we have a wide range of literature classes from international to American to British literature. You will have the option to publish your own work or work on projects that promote literature and drama on campus.

Program Structure and Requirements

To complete a degree in English, students must complete 93 credits within the English department. Students may choose combinations for the three Expanded modules and the three Basic modules.

Expanded modules are substantial blocks of courses in a particular area
Basic modules are smaller blocks of courses in a particular area

Expanded Modules = 36 credits (6 courses in each area)

Basic Modules = 24 credits (4 courses in each area)

  • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
    • Sample course titles: TESOL Methods, Language Acquisition, Bilingualism, Structure of Language
  • Translation and Interpretation
    • Sample course titles: Introduction to Translation and Interpretation, Principles of Translation, Principles of Interpretation, Phonetics
  • Literature
    • Sample course titles: Readings in American Literature, Readings in British Literature, Ethnic Literature, World Literature, 20th Century Literature, Drama

Students can choose from Option A and Option B as they build their program to suit their needs. All students must choose one expanded module.

Option A

Option B

Practicum Credits

Students are required to take at least 15 ECTS credits of practicum as part of 165 credits within major. This requirement is fulfilled by these pure practicum courses wherein the majority of the course work is done outside the traditional classroom where students practice their skills in a work setting: ENG 369 TESOL Practicum I (9), ENG 485 English Practicum (9) and ENG 482 Translation Practicum.

Degree Requirements

A degree in English consists of 240 ECTS credits:

  • Required Core Curriculum 51 Credits
  • English Core Curriculum 78 Credits
  • English Modules 87 Credits
  • Electives Outside the Major 24 Credits

Accreditation

In 2014, the English Language & Literature program was positively evaluated, by the Centre for Quality Assessment in Higher Education (SKVC), an independent public agency. The program is accredited through 2021-08-31.  To read excerpts from external evaluation report, please see here.

English Department Program Goals

Through training in rhetoric, oral and written communication, linguistics, literary analysis, and translation, students learn life-long skills in using English, or any language, to teach, persuade, and delight.

  1. Students build the intellectual groundwork for further training and research in graduate and professional programs in Lithuania and abroad.
  2. Students prepare for careers in both private and public sectors in Lithuania, the EU, and around the globe-anywhere that prizes the pairing of critical thinking with a professionally trained command of English.
  3. Students deepen their knowledge and practice in English by extensive study in the areas of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), Translation and Interpretation, and Literature. Depending upon their chosen emphasis of study, students cultivate their English language skills to perform such crucial and varied tasks as writing, editing, teaching, and translating.
  4. Based on extensive instruction in how the English language developed and continues to evolve, as well as how the structure of language functions more generally, students ground their practical, career-oriented competencies in an understanding of the interrelation of language and society.

Goal 1

Students build the intellectual groundwork for further training and research in graduate and professional programs in Lithuania and abroad.

Program Level Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

1A: Construct well- organized, rhetorical arguments through academic essays

1B: Synthesize researched evidence that supports an argument and appropriately document sources using in-text documentation, paraphrasing, and summarizing

1C: Comprehend, summarize and organize research articles into annotated bibliographies and literature reviews which synthesize significant research in professional fields

1D: Defend a thesis complete with an abstract, review of the literature, original or secondary research, and evaluation of the findings, including a public defense

Goal 2

Students deepen their knowledge and practice in English by extensive study in the areas of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), Translation and Interpretation, and Literature. Depending upon their chosen emphasis of study, students cultivate their English language skills to perform such crucial and varied tasks as writing, editing, teaching, and translating.

Program Level Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

2A: Define foundational concepts in English linguistics, sociolinguistics and psycholinguistics

2B: Investigate the English language in terms of morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, phonetics and phonology

2C: Differentiate aspects of discourse analysis based on the type and purpose of text or oral discourse, genre, audience, and the communicative situation

2D: Gain an understanding of translation/interpretation as the means of communication across languages and cultures

2E: Articulate current theories of first and second language acquisition and bilingualism

2F: Examine foreign language/TESOL teaching approaches and methods, in order to ascertain appropriate pedagogy for particular teaching contexts

2G: Understand and identify the power of literary structures, such as metaphor, structure, narration

2H: Deepen their practice of close reading of primary texts and then, with secondary sources, move to a synthesis of scholarly interpretations of literary works

2I: Articulate and utilize theories of general critical theory

2J: Explore multidisciplinary ideas of philosophy, history, memoir and theology through their studies in literature.

Goal 3

Students prepare for careers in both private and public sectors in Lithuania, the EU, and around the globe-anywhere that prizes the pairing of critical thinking with a professionally trained command of English.

These program goals are related to the modules that students chose.

Program Level Student Learning Outcomes in the area of TESOL

Students will be able to:

3A: Teach English lessons to students by designing lesson plans based on principles of teaching pedagogy

3B: Deliver lessons based on principles of teaching pedagogy and effective use of course books and authentic materials

3C: Successfully implement basic classroom management principles in the classroom with pupils

3D: Develop professional work habits in a school/ work setting

Program Level Student Learning Outcomes in the area of translation and interpretation

Students will be able to:

3F: Develop strategies for listening and speaking to work as a translator/ interpreter

3G: Identify and complete the steps of a translation project

3H: Analyze the skills required of an interpreter

3I Practice translation and interpretation skills in a supervised setting while learning to express the meaning and message in the other language as coherently, accurately, and smoothly as possible

Program Level Student Learning Outcomes in the area of literary studies:

Students will be able to:

3J: Demonstrate basic skills of literary interpretation, such as formal criticism, comparative textual analysis, and close reading

3K: Apply methods of literary research to synthesize ideas from primary texts, secondary texts and apply critical theory into academic papers

Goal 4

Based on extensive instruction in how the English language developed and continues to evolve, as well as how the structure of language functions more generally, students ground their practical, career-oriented competencies in an understanding of the interrelation of language and society.

Program Level Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

4A: Progress from receiving knowledge to critically thinking about knowledge to creativity

4B: Hone skills in writing cogent prose for the purpose of differentiating subjective points of truth about texts, and to craft rhetorical arguments in order to positivity contribute to society

4C: Create a variety of expository texts which exhibit critical thinking, an awareness of audience, and strong writer’s voice with an understanding of the social effects of language as well as a commitment to open dialogue.

English sample program plan is available here »